Tag Archives: Vancouver

Dault vs. Cézanne

by Jason Smythe

2015-04-30 21.03.00

This article is written from a place of pure joy. Ever since my triumphant return to Vancouver (and by triumphant I mean I survived a year of grad school in Alberta) I have been radiating pure bliss at levels that far exceed the recommended daily dosage. This “toxicity” that I am oozing so willingly can be attributed to the fact that I am no longer reading academic tomes that seem to strive for Saharan levels of dryness, which I suspect is part of a long-standing and incredibly sadistic plot by ivory tower types to make all grad students more boring at parties. Our pain truly is their pleasure. Continue reading

When was the Last Time You Visited an Art Gallery?

by Micaela Kwiatkowski

Micaela was on her feet around Vancouver, guerrilla-interviewing few Vancouverites to see how they felt about Contemporary Art.

jessJess, Psychology student  

When was the last time you visited an art gallery?

I was at the MoMA and the Guggenheim a few months ago during my trip to New York.

What do you think contemporary art is?

Oh awkward, I don’t really know. Colourful?! Continue reading

Tom Burrows Exhibition Contributes to Dialogue Surrounding Vancouver Housing

by Shaina Dickson

Opening reception of "Tom Burrows", January 8, 2015. Photo by Michael R. Barrick, Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery Tom Burrows

Opening reception of “Tom Burrows”, January 8, 2015.
Photo by Michael R. Barrick, Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery

Tom Burrows, a Vancouver/Hornby Island-based artist, presents a wide breadth of his work at the Morris and Helen Belkin Gallery at the University of British Columbia, spanning from the 1960s to the present. Burrows has made crucial contributions to the development of Vancouver’s art scene, as both an artist and educator. The exhibition, curated by Scott Watson, leads the viewer through the timeline of Burrows’ work, showing the progressive momentum of his practice. It begins with his documentation of squatting and travelling, and wraps up with his polymer resin panels.

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Vancouver Especially (A Vancouver Special scaled to its property value in 1973, then increased by 8 fold)

by Kiel Torres

 "Vancouver Especially (A Vancouver Special scaled to its property value in 1973, then increased by 8 fold)", Ken Lum, 2015

“Vancouver Especially (A Vancouver Special scaled to its property value in 1973, then increased by 8 fold)”, Ken Lum, 2015

Condo, trendy café, forward vegan restaurant, hip record store, swanky boutique, Vancouver Special?!, condo, condo, condo…

Ken Lum has transformed 221A’s new outdoor exhibition space at 271 Union Street into the site of crossroads between two Vancouver housing typologies with his new installation, Vancouver Especially (A Vancouver Special scaled to its property value in 1973, then increased by 8 fold). What was once an empty lot sandwiched between two new condominium complexes is now occupied by Lum’s 1:3 scale replica of a Vancouver Special. Continue reading

Adrift: Matthew Buckingham’s Obscure Moorings at Satellite

by Sarah Davidson

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Matthew Buckingham’s show, on now at Satellite, situates viewers in a strange position relative to his wandering film. Viewers are implicated in the act of understanding the film, and this is highlighted most immediately by the artist’s spatial intervention in the gallery: a gigantic wave-shaped viewing platform, covered in carpet. Buckingham often takes history and narrative as his subjects, and this work is no exception. In Obscure Moorings, based on an obscure character sketch by Herman Melville, a defunct sailor meanders unhappily through modern-day Liverpool and eventually dies.

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DIY: Rent prices high ***ART SPACE WANTED***

by Katharina Schulz

AndrewVolk1

In this socially awkward city, where eye contact on the street is shocking for most, there is an underlying desire to bump shoulders, shake bodies, nod heads together, and shed our social stigmas. Do It Yourself projects offer alternatives to established modes of entertainment, art, culture, and social space. They attempt to foster a sense of community, the “starving artists” become autonomous gallerists, and dancing to house music becomes romantic again. Continue reading

A Tight (But Still Creative) City

by Jason Smythe

Tight City

One of the Canada Line’s exit shelters is located at the intersection of Robson and Granville, and it is a rather mundane structure, with a look that can best be described as cookie-cutter modernist. I say this because it looks like something you could buy at Ikea. However, over the eons one thing has remained constant: using art to liven up even the most boring of structures. Thankfully, this most Ikea of exit shelters has received some art: the installation Tight City. Continue reading