Tag Archives: Stella Hsu

2 on 1: An Interview with Adriana Estrada-Centelles

by Stella Hsu and Rhys Edwards

Bullets from the Body of CrimeThe Body of the Crime by Marcos Ramírez Erre

Satellite’s bloggers Stella Hsu and Rhys Edwards interview the curator of our current exhibition Broken Borders

Stella Hsu (SH): Describe the narrative of how Broken Borders came to be.

Adriana Estrada-Cantelles (AEC): During the first year of my masters in Critical and Curatorial Studies at the University of British Columbia, many of the readings and discussions were focused on the war on terrorism and the relationship between war, violence and contemporary art. Art history and contemporary art theory have developed ways of thinking about the resulting violence as well as the various forms of its representation in contemporary art. This war on terrorism, between the United States and Middle East, has left aside other urgent conversations on war and violence, such as the drug war in Mexico. I was interested in foregrounding, in terms of curatorial practice, a contemporary war on a much more complex, global scale that has changed the artistic production of many Mexico-based artists.
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Broken Borders – Breaking Borders

by Stella Hsu

Photograph by Amie Beaton

Broken Borders is an exhibition that examines the drug war through the works of four Mexican artists: Teresa Margolles, Rosa Maria Robles, Marcos Ramirez Erre, and Jorge Malacón. This exhibition at Satellite Gallery and Access Gallery points to a situation in Mexico where the lives of civilians have been compromised into a state of fear.

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Action-Camera: Beijing Performance Photography

by Stella Hsu

Action-Camera: Beijing Performance Photography was an exhibition curated by Keith Wallace in 2009 at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery. The exhibition featured the works of fifteen Chinese artists, such as Ai Weiwei, Ma Liuming and He Chengyao, who work primarily in Beijing and have contributed to the emergence of Chinese contemporary art in the international art community. Unfortunately, I have never walked through the exhibition and have missed the opportunity of experiencing it.  I only became aware  of the catalogue recently because it stood out from a well curated collection of books in the Satellite Gallery Bookstore. Its black cover page drew me in and made me wonder what was inside.

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The Opening of Palomar: Michael Morris

by Stella Hsu

Feburary 4th was the opening reception of Palomar: Michael Morris at the Satellite Gallery, where artists, curators, writers, and art lovers alike gathered to enjoy Morris’ sculptures as well as the company of each other. In conjunction with the exhibition Letters: Michael Morris and Concrete Poetry at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Palomar consists of works which adds to the viewers’ understanding of Morris’ art practice.

It was also during the opening where photographer, Henri Robideau, introduced his book Babyland, featuring Mick Henry, Vincent Trasov and Michael Morris. A limited number of signed copies of Babyland can be purchased at the Satellite Gallery bookstore.

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Interview with Mo Salemy

by Stella Hsu

Nature, Knowledge and the Knower

How does the title Nature, Knowledge and the Knower correlate with the exhibition and, more specifically, with history? What do you mean by the term the knower?

In their coauthored book, Objectivity, Lorraine Datson and Peter Galison establish a relationship between nature and knowledge that is mediated by the artist and/or the scientist as the knower. The knower is the one who sees and ultimately knows nature and whose abilities are measured by what s/he already knows. Through these acts, the knower not only arrives at knowing but contributes to new ways of seeing and knowing. These new conditions, as they put it, should not only be seen as obstacles to objectivity or truth but as their very condition. It is in the figure of the knower that the objective world and the subjective opinion about that world find a two-way mediation.

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Collaborative Play

by Stella Hsu

                                Non-lexical Vocable Windows by Christy Nyiri

Before entering the gallery space of 221A, I was greeted by a series of colourful texts that evoked a sense of play. The image above is a depiction of Christy Nyiri’s Non-lexical Vocable Windows where seven window panels are covered by words taken from the chorus of seven different songs: Too High, Walk on the Wild Side, You Can Call Me Al, Jeremy, Dreams, How Deep Is Your Love, Tarzan Boy. Because the windows cannot be seen through from the outside, the artwork plays with the idea of transparency where the act of looking through has been redirected to the surface of things. What kinds of messages do the windows bring forth? The artist’s use of windows asks us to look ‘through’ the windows in a different manner.

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