Tag Archives: Presentation House Gallery

Exploring Mainstreeters: Taking Advantage, 1972−1982

by Micaela Kwiatkowski

Kenneth Fletcher’s House, 1978, Courtesy of Paul Wong

Kenneth Fletcher’s House, 1978, Courtesy of Paul Wong

Satellite Gallery’s current exhibition, Mainstreeters: Taking Advantage 1972-1982 explores the beginning of an East Vancouver Art Gang. The exhibition includes a variety of film installations —ranging from old school TVs to large projections— of their adventures and artistic experiments. Alongside the film recordings are photographs documenting the group, newspaper clippings, and a crime scene investigation.  Continue reading

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What Right?

By Tobin Gibson

Jils 2

In navigating the contemporary retail environment, appropriation appears as a by-product of production. My first interaction with Jil Sander’s infamous shopper was in Selfridges one grey London afternoon, with the sac carelessly thrown under a thick pane of glass that composed a surface for other Sander merchandise. Its casual, slumped nature seemed to pose a threat to its regal shopping environment. Continue reading

Talk by Arnaud Desjardin at Satellite

To mark the beginning of the collaboration between READ books and Satellite Gallery, we hosted a book launch on November 23, 2013 of BOBOAB—the Book On Books On Artists’ Books. The book’s author and editor, Arnaud Desjardin, gave a short talk on the book and his work with The Everyday Press. Here, we welcome you to listen to this talk, whether you were unable to attend or want to relive the experience. BOBOAB continues to be sold at the Satellite Gallery bookstore.

Click the link for a picture slideshow.

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Talk by Michael Turner, Stan Douglas and Tim Lee for NEWS! at the Satellite Gallery

Notable Vancouver visual artists Stan Douglas and Tim Lee spoke about different approaches to working with historical photographs, films and audio-visual materials. Both artists often work with material culture from the past, investing it with new meanings. They provided insights into their research processes and ideas about media histories. Michael Turner acted as an interlocutor in the discussion; drawing on his extensive knowledge of the cultural life of this city.

This talk took place at the Satellite Gallery on Saturday, March 23, 2013.

Horvat Meets Fashion

by Emile Rubino

1974, Paris, for Stern, shoe and Eiffel Tower1974, Paris, for Stern, shoe and Eiffel Tower, Photo Courtesy of
Presentation House Gallery

“The last thing I want to show is the model’s head,” said French photographer Frank Horvat with irony during his conversation with curator Vince Aletti at Emily Carr University last Saturday. His statement nicely sums up the personality of the man. This “Robespierre of fashion photography,” as Horvat amusingly called himself, is presenting a selection of his fashion work along with some of his street and documentary photographs at Presentation House Gallery until December 23rd.

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Performing Intertextuality: An Unconventional Tour of Phantasmagoria

by Liza Montgomery

Phantasmagoria, left: MATHEW MCWILLIAMSPhantasmagoria at Presentation House Gallery

Aaron Peck’s brief but enlightening “tour” of Presentation House Gallery’s Phantasmagoria was far from conventional. Much to my delight—and possibly some other attendees’ confusion—rather than reiterating the curatorial narrative, Peck, a local art critic and writer, staged a performative rewriting of it. By offering up an open-ended alternative reading of the artwork, he highlighted the intertextual nature of meaning formation, drawing attention to the shifting conditions that influence our relationship to an artwork. These are important considerations given the form and function of Phantasmagoria—a group show that captures the Zeitgeist of current photo-based art practices in Vancouver.

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Emily Carr and the Theatre of Transcendence

by Rhys Edwards

Emily Carr and the Theatre of Transcendence is refreshingly daring. It’s located on the fourth floor of the Vancouver Art Gallery, where few are likely to venture after trawling though an abundance of other spectacles. And, while the Gallery’s endorsement of Carr is ever-omnipresent, the variety of artworks on display exhibit a clear and consistent engagement with transcendentalism, while some works overtly aspire towards or even exude sublimity.

Emily Carr, Tree Trunk [detail], 1931, oil on canvas, courtesy of Vancouver Art Gallery

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