Tag Archives: Photography

Book Review: Paris June Fourth, Fifth, & Sixth, Two Thousand & Six by Dana Claxton

by June Lee

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Capture Photography festival is an event that features local and international artists and their accomplishments as the media of photography and documentation. Dana Claxton, a Vancouver based artist, has contributed many of her works including her book Paris June Fourth, Fifth, & Sixth, Two Thousand & Six, which recounts her three day stay in Paris, France. Her book contains 77 black and white photographs taken from Parisian urban life, that investigate issues of gender studies, Western culture fetishes, and the commodification of aboriginal aesthetics in contemporary culture. Continue reading

NEWS! Panel Discussion with Staff Photographers, March 16th, 2013

This discussion took place at the Satellite Gallery during the NEWS! exhibit on March 16th. News photographers were invited to talk about their careers and opinions on news photography. Participating are Glenn Baglo, Ralph Bower, John Denniston and Ric Ernst. Enjoy!

Talk by Michael Turner, Stan Douglas and Tim Lee for NEWS! at the Satellite Gallery

Notable Vancouver visual artists Stan Douglas and Tim Lee spoke about different approaches to working with historical photographs, films and audio-visual materials. Both artists often work with material culture from the past, investing it with new meanings. They provided insights into their research processes and ideas about media histories. Michael Turner acted as an interlocutor in the discussion; drawing on his extensive knowledge of the cultural life of this city.

This talk took place at the Satellite Gallery on Saturday, March 23, 2013.

I Found a Dreamscape

by Jane Sojin Kim

IMG_4752 Artwork by Heidi Kerr, photo courtesy of Leif Friggstad

On the fringe of January, the Concourse Gallery at Emily Carr University was transformed into a dreamscape. In the exhibition Stratified Spaces, people’s stories were poetically narrated through photographs and installations. Images of the interior and exterior of houses provoked memories of home, while other installations lured me into a completely new and untouched—even surreal—realm. Continue reading

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Satellite Gallery runs an internship program that often enlist students from Emily Carr University of Art and Design (ECU). Their enthusiasm and interest in taking on different roles in the field of art not only amaze us but also bring a source of energy that stimulates the gallery. Jane So-Jin Kim and Emile Rubino are two of our current interns who have adopted the multidisciplinary approach to art. The followings are their reviews of each other’s work as artist and curator at ECU.
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Interview with Marian Penner Bancroft

by Avalon Mott

Marian Penner Bancroft, Vancouver Art GallerySpiritlands: t/HERE: Marian Penner Bancroft Selected Photo Works 1975-2000 at the Vancouver Art Gallery

Marian Penner Bancroft is a photographer. Anyone who has even a little knowledge about the Vancouver Photo Conceptualist movement beginning in the 1980s, or is a student at Emily Carr University, knows this. What I didn’t know is how expansive and yet meticulously constructed Bancroft’s practice is. Walking up to the second floor of the Vancouver Art Gallery to view her retrospective Spiritlands: t/HERE: Marian Penner Bancroft Selected Photo Works 1975-2000, I was unsure of what to expect. I have had the privilege to call Marian Penner Bancroft a professor, and so I come to her work wanting validation for the criticism she posed to me about my own photographs. What I witnessed surpassed this desire. Not only is the care and consideration for the photographic medium and respect for traditional printing methods demonstrated through out Spiritlands: t/HERE, but Bancroft’s voice as an artist is clearly articulated. Her work is engaging and thought provoking while being visually pleasing. The perfect trifecta.

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Camera Absentia: B/I

by Sean Michael Nelson

Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida

How does one express the grief over the loss of a loved one? Roland Barthes wrote several works in the wake of his mother’s death, among them Camera Lucida, a personal reflection on the essence of photography. In it, Barthes notes that the “photograph does not necessarily say what is no longer, but only and for certain what has been.” Ishiuchi Miyako’s (石内 都) photographic series Mother’s (2000 – 2005) is one instance where photographs say what-is-no-longer through what-has-been. Continue reading