Tag Archives: history

Dault vs. Cézanne

by Jason Smythe

2015-04-30 21.03.00

This article is written from a place of pure joy. Ever since my triumphant return to Vancouver (and by triumphant I mean I survived a year of grad school in Alberta) I have been radiating pure bliss at levels that far exceed the recommended daily dosage. This “toxicity” that I am oozing so willingly can be attributed to the fact that I am no longer reading academic tomes that seem to strive for Saharan levels of dryness, which I suspect is part of a long-standing and incredibly sadistic plot by ivory tower types to make all grad students more boring at parties. Our pain truly is their pleasure. Continue reading

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Vancouver Especially (A Vancouver Special scaled to its property value in 1973, then increased by 8 fold)

by Kiel Torres

 "Vancouver Especially (A Vancouver Special scaled to its property value in 1973, then increased by 8 fold)", Ken Lum, 2015

“Vancouver Especially (A Vancouver Special scaled to its property value in 1973, then increased by 8 fold)”, Ken Lum, 2015

Condo, trendy café, forward vegan restaurant, hip record store, swanky boutique, Vancouver Special?!, condo, condo, condo…

Ken Lum has transformed 221A’s new outdoor exhibition space at 271 Union Street into the site of crossroads between two Vancouver housing typologies with his new installation, Vancouver Especially (A Vancouver Special scaled to its property value in 1973, then increased by 8 fold). What was once an empty lot sandwiched between two new condominium complexes is now occupied by Lum’s 1:3 scale replica of a Vancouver Special. Continue reading

Art of Storytelling: A Visit to Ola Volo’s Solo Show Opening

by Ellie Chung

Ola Volo

Ola Volo

Last Thursday night, I rushed to Make studio, located on east 7th avenue where a Vancouver based illustrator from Kazakhstan, Ola Volo’s solo show opening was taking place. Ola Volo is well known for her distinctive artistic style: flattened, highly intricate and decorative images of figures, architecture, domestic commodities, flora and fauna with a variety of elaborate patterns. When I arrived, it was ten minutes to the end of the event. However the atmosphere there was far from closing.

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NEON LEGACY

by Rhys Edwards

MOV-Neon-BuddhaImage courtesy of Museum of Vancouver

Was there ever time when Vancouver was “authentic?”

The Museum of Vancouver’s latest permanent exhibition—Neon Vancouver/Ugly Vancouver—recounts the history of Vancouver’s love affair with neon signage. Several conserved signs illuminate visitors as they browse the documents that reconstruct this history. Among other things, visitors are asked if the abundance of neon signage in Vancouver, between the 1950s and 1970s, indicates the authenticity of this era. Continue reading

Presence of the Past

by Janine C. Grant

In a city that constantly feels like it is getting newer by the day, it is important to get away to the old.  It is important to be confronted with history in its physical form; to survey the landscape and imagine a piece of you existing thousands of years before.  To take the time to appreciate the importance of the past—all the moments, be they mundane—that has lead you to your current state, alive.

Perhaps I am being over sentimental, dramatic, or just a plain anthropology nerd but whenever I go to see ruins I get this tingle running through my body.  My hands long to touch the stone, my fingers to trace the patterns.  I cannot help but imagine a hand thousands of years earlier doing the same.

I had this same feeling this summer when I visited Patara, an archaeological site in the present day village of Ovagelemis, Turkey. Patara is one of the oldest cities of Lycia dating back in Hittite texts to the 13th Century BC.  Its beachside access and ideal sailing conditions helped to maintain its importance throughout the years.  A few claims to fame include the birthplace of Saint Nicholas and the stop over site of Paul the Apostle, who is noted to have visited on one of his journeys to Rome.

Below are a few images of the ruins:

Entering the archeological site. The beach, located a 5 minute drive and
5 minute walk away from the entrance, has served for millions of years as one of the rare nesting sites of the Mediterranean loggerhead sea turtles.

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Art, History, and Hiroshima

By Rhys Edwards

                                                   Photo by Ishiuchi Miyako

After several exhibitions throughout Japan since 2008, ひろしま hiroshima  by Ishiuchi Miyako opened recently at the Museum of Anthropology, marking the exhibition’s first foray into North America. Artist Ishiuchi Miyako began her professional photography career in the 1970s, and since then has become one of Japan’s foremost contemporary photographers. As an artist, she is predominantly concerned with the notion of personal memory and how it is disseminated through the human body as well as material objects.

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It Pays to Play by Peter White

A picture-perfect nuclear family holding hands on Miracle Beach, an unrecognizably cube-shaped Vancouver Public Library, the chalky pastels of roadside motels – these are images of a somewhat foggy past, at once familiar and yet completely alien. It is this feeling of recollection tinted with distance that we see in It Pays to Play: British Columbia in Postcards, 1950s-1980s, Peter White’s exhibition catalogue of B.C. Tourist postcards since the 1950s. These cards are blinding in their saturation and optimism, showing British Columbia not as it was, but as it aspired to be, with its beautiful scenery, urban landscapes, and leisurely visitors on display.

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